FEWER LASHINGS OF WHEELED CARGO

THANKS TO STENA

With joint forces, Stena Line and Stena Teknik have gained ground for maintaining current operational procedures regarding weather dependent lashing of wheeled cargo in short-sea shipping.

When a revision of the regulations for weather dependent lashing (WDL) of wheeled cargo came up at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), Stena Line’s Safety & Security Manager Jörgen Lorén realised that the amendments suggested would have significant consequences for their routes.

”The proposal, presented by the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS), assumed a need for extensive lashing of the cargo. In practice, it would affect every departure with longer loading and unloading times and higher costs as a result,” he says.

At this time, 2017, Jörgen Lorén was a member of a working group within the Swedish Transport Agency with insight in the process. And he felt that the Swedish Shipowners’ Association aught to have someone that could support the shipping companies in this issue. The choice fell on Jacob Norrby at Stena Teknik.

 

CURRENT PRACTICE WORKS WELL

Together with the consulting firm MariTerm, Stena Teknik and Stena Line conducted a study to show that the practical application of current regulations, in the form of the CSS code (Safe Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing) and the ISM code (International Safety Management), works well on the routes that Stena Line and other Scandinavian short-sea shipping companies service.

”All ships carrying wheeled cargo must, in their operational procedures manual, describe how they secure the cargo. The parameters include type of cargo carrier, placement of the cargo on board, as well as forecasts of weather and wave heights during the journey. The shipping companies in Scandinavia have developed routines that work well for the conditions prevailing here. They imply that lashing is only needed in a few cases. Lashing both takes a long time and increases the risk of personal injury,” says Jacob Norrby, Project Manager at Stena Teknik.

 

DEEP SEA AND SHORT SEA DIFFER

For deep sea shipping, the cargo is always lashed due to the great uncertainty about what weather conditions and wave heights one can expect on the intended voyage. The proposed changes of the regulations were based on theoretical formulas and weather conditions typical for rough weather in the northern North Atlantic Ocean.

”But we don’t sail there. Our masters know what weather to expect on the voyage, which normally takes less than five hours. When it comes to weather dependent securing of wheeled cargo in short-sea shipping, there are more parameters that are relevant than the number of lashings, such as the speed of the ship and how the cargo is secured inside the carriers. Today, we handle wheeled cargo by a combination of block loading and of lashing part of the cargo, which works well,” says Jörgen Lorén, adding:

”Early in the process, we succeeded in convincing IACS to withdraw their proposal. And we’ve lobbied for our cause in working groups within the Swedish Shipowners’ Association, IMO and Interferry to convince the flag states that the model we use today works fine. Most flag states now support Stena’s standpoint and we’ve been successful in conveying principles for the proposed revision of the CSS code that are well in line with the current Swedish regulations, which is extremely satisfactory. Now, the matter lies at IMO that will consider the proposal in its Maritime Safety Committee in the spring of 2020.

Stena Teknik and Stena Line are continuously involved in this kind of assignments, which is an important job not only for Stena but for the entire shipping industry.

Top right: Jacob Norrby, Stena Teknik
Bottom right: Jörgen Lorén, Stena Line

Stena Line // March 20, 2020

WEATHER DEPENDENT LASHING OF WHEELED CARGO

With joint forces, Stena Line and Stena Teknik have gained ground for maintaining current operational procedures regarding weather dependent lashing of wheeled cargo
in short-sea shipping.

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